Travel restrictions are now in place for people who have been in South Africa, Lesotho, Eswatini, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, or Malawi in the last 14 days.

Australian citizens, permanent residents or their immediate family members entering Australia who have been in any of these countries in the last 14 days must enter supervised quarantine for 14 days in line with state and territory requirements. This is regardless of vaccination status.

Any other travellers who have been in these countries in the last 14 days are not permitted to enter Australia. This applies even if they hold a travel exemption, eligible visa or are seeking to enter under a safe travel zone arrangement.

Restrictions may change at short notice. All travellers should check requirements in the state or territory of arrival, including quarantine and testing requirements.

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Fully vaccinated Australian citizens, permanent residents and from 15 December eligible visa holders can travel to and from Australia without needing to apply for a travel exemption.

You may also be able to travel to Australia without seeking a travel exemption if you are fully vaccinated and you are automatically exempt from Australia’s travel restrictions, or if you are travelling to Australia under a safe travel zone arrangement.  

All other people seeking to travel to Australia must apply for a travel exemption.

If you are coming to or from Australia you can check what you need to do before you travel by following the below guides:

Fully vaccinated

Australia considers you to be fully vaccinated if you have completed a course of a Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) approved or recognised vaccine. This includes mixed doses. Current vaccines and dosages accepted for the purposes of travel are:

  • Two doses at least 14 days apart of:
    • AstraZeneca Vaxzevria
    • AstraZeneca Covishield
    • Pfizer/Biontech Comirnaty
    • Moderna Spikevax or Takeda
    • Sinovac Coronavac
    • Bharat Biotech Covaxin
    • Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV (for 18-60 year olds).
  • Or one dose of:
    • Johnson & Johnson/ Janssen-Cilag COVID Vaccine.

The TGA is evaluating other COVID-19 vaccines that may be recognised for the purposes of inbound travel to Australia in future. The most up-to-date information on approved and recognised vaccines is available on the TGA website.

At least 7 days must have passed since the final dose of vaccine in a course of immunisation for you to be considered fully vaccinated. Mixed doses count towards being fully vaccinated as long as all vaccines are approved or recognised by the TGA.

If you have not been vaccinated with the above doses or schedule, you do not meet Australia’s definition of ‘fully vaccinated.’ This includes instances where the dosing schedule or vaccine eligibility differs in your country of origin. There are some exceptions to this as outlined below.

Vaccination exceptions and arrangements for children

Travellers with acceptable proof they cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, and children under 12 can access the same travel arrangement as fully vaccinated travellers.

Arrangements are also in place to allow unvaccinated or partially vaccinated children aged 12-17 years to travel with a fully vaccinated adult. For quarantine arrangements check state or territory information for travellers.

If the child is travelling with unvaccinated adult family members, then the entire family group will be subject to managed quarantine and passenger caps.

Children aged under 12 years count as fully vaccinated for travel purposes. Their passport will be used as proof of age.

Passports will also be used as proof of age for unvaccinated or partially vaccinated 12-17 year olds.

Proof of vaccination when leaving or travelling to Australia

If you were vaccinated in Australia, you will need to show airline staff your International COVID-19 Vaccination Certificate (ICVC). The ICVC will be provided in PDF format for you to print or hold electronically on your phone.

If you were vaccinated overseas and do not have an ICVC, you will need to present a foreign vaccination certificate that meets all of the requirements outlined on the Australian Passport Office website.

Getting a vaccination certificate does not mean that you are fully vaccinated. For example, your vaccination certificate may show that you have only had one dose of a two-dose vaccine. If your vaccination certificate does not prove that you that you meet Australia’s definition of fully vaccinated, you cannot use it for leaving or entering Australia. It is your responsibility to know your vaccination status and ensure your vaccine certificate supports your eligibility to travel to and from Australia. 

You must also comply with all other requirements for coming to Australia.

If the name on your vaccination certificate does not match your passport

If you are an Australian passport holder and you have changed your name, you can find information about how to get a new passport by contacting the Australian Passport Office.

If you were vaccinated in Australia but cannot get an ICVC because the name details on your vaccination certificate do not match your passport, you will need to contact the Australian Immunisation Register.

If you are travelling with a foreign vaccination certificate that does not match the name in your passport, you should also ensure that you have other evidence of your name, such as a marriage certificate or driver’s licence.

If you cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons

If you are a traveller who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, you will need to provide proof of a medical exemption. You should also check any requirements, particularly quarantine requirements, in the state or territory to which you are travelling.

Departing Australia

If you are an Australian citizen or permanent resident departing Australia you need to show evidence that you have a medical contraindication reported to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) for all COVID-19 vaccines available in Australia. As proof you should provide your Australian COVID-19 digital certificate. You can otherwise provide your immunisation history statement.

If a temporary medical contraindication has been recorded on the AIR, the COVID-19 digital certificate will display a ‘valid to’ date. After this time, you will need to either:

  • check with your doctor to see if you can now get a COVID-19 vaccine; or
  • ask your doctor to update your status on the AIR if your medical contraindication is still valid.

If you cannot provide evidence that your medical contraindication has been listed in the AIR, you will need to apply for an exemption to leave Australia.

Only eligible health professionals as defined on the Department of Health website can report medical contraindications to the AIR. If you cannot demonstrate that your medical contradiction has been reported to the Australian Immunisation Register, you will need to apply for an exemption to leave Australia. 

Coming to Australia

You should check any requirements, particularly quarantine and post-arrival testing requirements, in the state or territory to which you are travelling as this will impact your travel arrangements. You will need to provide a medical certificate that indicates you are unable to be vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine because of a medical condition; the medical certificate must include the following information:

  • your name (this must match your travel identification documents)
  • date of medical consultation and details of your medical practitioner
  • details that clearly acknowledge that you have a medical condition which means you cannot receive a COVID-19 vaccination (vaccination is contraindicated).

People who have received non-TGA approved or recognised vaccines should not be certified in this category and cannot be treated as vaccinated for the purposes of their travel.

If you are planning on traveling onwards to or through a different state or territory when you arrive in Australia, you need to check domestic travel restrictions. States and territories can apply their own travel restrictions.

You are responsible for complying with travel restrictions and requirements that apply to you.

Quarantine and local requirements

You need to comply with requirements in the state or territory of your arrival, and any other state or territories that you plan to travel to. This includes quarantine and post-arrival testing requirements. Restrictions may change at short notice.

You may be eligible for reduced quarantine requirements when you return to Australia depending on the state or territory to which you are travelling.

NOTE: Australian citizens, permanent residents or their immediate family members entering Australia who have been in South Africa, Lesotho, Eswatini, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, or Malawi in the last 14 days must enter supervised quarantine for 14 days in line with state and territory requirements irrespective of their vaccination status.

It is your responsibility to ensure that you meet entry, quarantine and any other arrangements for each state or territory to which you are travelling. You may be responsible for costs of quarantine if you arrive in a state or territory without meeting entry requirements.

If you wish to travel on to another state or territory you may not be allowed to enter, or may be subject to a quarantine period.

To check requirements, see State and Territory Information for travellers

New arrangements for eligible visa holders

From 15 December 2021, fully vaccinated eligible visa holders can travel to Australia without needing to apply for a travel exemption. This includes eligible visa holders in Australia seeking to depart and return. 

To be considered an eligible visa holder you must hold one of the following visas. If you have applied for the visa but it has not yet been granted, you are not an eligible visa holder.

 

Visa

Subclass 163 – State/Territory Sponsored Business Owner Visa

Subclass 173 – Contributory Parent (Temporary) visa

Subclass 200 – Refugee visa

Subclass 201 – In-country Special Humanitarian visa

Subclass 202 – Global Special Humanitarian visa

Subclass 203 – Emergency Rescue visa

Subclass 204 – Woman at Risk visa

Subclass 300 – Prospective Marriage visa

Subclass 400 – Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) visa

Subclass 402 – Training and Research visa

Subclass 403 – Temporary Work (International Relations) visa (other streams, including Australian Agriculture Visa stream)

Subclass 405 – Investor Retirement visa

Subclass 407 – Training visa

Subclass 408 – Temporary Activity visa

Subclass 410 – Retirement visa

Subclass 417 – Working Holiday visa

Subclass 449 – Humanitarian Stay (Temporary) visa

Subclass 457 – Temporary Work (Skilled) visa

Subclass 461 – New Zealand Citizen Family Relationship visa

Subclass 462 – Work and Holiday visa

Subclass 476 – Skilled – Recognised Graduate visa

Subclass 482 – Temporary Skill Shortage visa

Subclass 485 – Temporary Graduate visa

Subclass 487 – Skilled – Regional Sponsored visa

Subclass 489 – Skilled – Regional (Provisional) visa

Subclass 491 – Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa

Subclass 494 – Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (Provisional) visa

Subclass 500 – Student visa

Subclass 560 – Student Temporary Visa

Subclass 571 – Student Schools Sector Visa

Subclass 572 – Vocational Education and Training Sector Visa

Subclass 573 – Higher Education Sector Visa

Subclass 574 – Postgraduate Research Sector Visa

Subclass 575 – Non-Award Sector Visa

Subclass 580 – Student Guardian visa 

Subclass 590 – Student Guardian visa

Subclass 785 – Temporary Protection visa

Subclass 786 – Temporary Humanitarian Concern visa

Subclass 790 – Safe Haven Enterprise visa

Subclass 870 – Sponsored Parent (Temporary) visa

Subclass 884 – Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary) visa

Subclass 988 – Maritime Crew visa

Note:  Additional visa subclasses may be added over time. 

This is in addition to the exemptions outlined on: Travel restrictions and exemptions